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A Survey of Teachers Show They Are Still Wary of Common Core

by Christine Stuart | May 22, 2014 10:26am
(3) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Education, Poll

A survey of the two largest teacher unions found that Connecticut teachers continue to be concerned about implementing the Common Core State Standards.

The survey of 600 teachers — 500 from the Connecticut Education Association and 100 from AFT Connecticut — found that educators are concerned about the time, support, and professional training opportunities available to them.

The new survey, which was presented to Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s task force on the Common Core on Wednesday, found that 82 percent are concerned about the amount of time they have to “adequately learn, develop, and implement common core standards.”

About 81 percent are concerned about having adequate technology for assessment and curriculum to help them implement the Common Core and 78 percent are concerned about training opportunities.

The survey also found that the concerns among teachers in towns with lower wealth are higher than those in towns with greater wealth about the support available to them.

Kelly Donnelly, state Department of Education spokeswoman, said the department has not been able to review the results of the survey in depth, but “based upon our initial review, the survey appears to provide valuable information.”

“Teachers have provided thoughtful and important input throughout the process of implementing the Common Core,” Donnelly said. “That’s why we’ve lowered the stakes and increased supports during the transition to the new standards.”

In January, the Education Department and Malloy decided to decouple the new teacher evaluation system and implementation of the Common Core. At the same, the department decided not to spend $1 million on a public relations campaign to promote the Common Core.

“We’ve delinked the use of state test data from teacher evaluations for two years, offered districts flexibility regarding which state tests to administer this year, stepped-up the state-supported trainings, and developed a website resource for educators providing quality Common Core materials,” Donnelly said. “We will continue to welcome feedback from teachers and look forward to the recommendations of the Governor’s Common Core Taskforce. The survey, when combined with the taskforce recommendations and superintendent input, will help inform the Department’s future decisions and strengthen our supports in the coming academic year.”

The survey of teachers was conducted by Abacus Associates of Northampton, Mass. by telephone in April, and has a 4 percent margin of error.

Earlier this month, a University of Connecticut national survey found that only 39 percent of voters are aware of Common Core State Standards.

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(3) Comments

posted by: Matt W. | May 22, 2014  11:28am

Matt W.

So the roll out hasn’t been handled well and they need more resources?  WOW! Shocking!

posted by: dano860 | May 22, 2014  3:22pm

The question should have been;
1. Since the test results are not linked (delinked?) to your performance evaluation are you concerned about the lack of support and training you are receiving?
2. If the test results were linked to your performance evaluation would you be concerned about the lack of support and training you are receiving?
I hope everyone gets a chance to help their child, niece, nephew, grandchild or neighbors kids with their homework. My granddaughter had to explain “tens stacking” to me.
The other part of this new magic program is that
they believe the kids in Appalachia are going to learn the same as the ones in Greenwich, Ct. This is just another failed program looking for a place to happen!

posted by: Bluecoat | May 23, 2014  10:52am

Still no worries from the teaching leadership about the creepy data collection going on in the classroom.
Why such silence on this?
Do we have to always live like these things are inevitable?
Will someone in the CEA or AFT stand up and say that teachers in CT will not participate in any survey or electronic test that purges our kids of personal and private information?
<http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/05/22/Study-New-Technology-Development-Pushed-By-Feds-Allows-For-Data-Collection-on-Every-Child>