Social Networks We Use

Categories

CT Tech Junkie Feed

Connecticut Consumers to Begin Receiving E-Book Settlement Refunds
Mar 25, 2014 4:09 pm
Connecticut residents will start receiving refund checks or credits this week for e-books purchased between April 1,...more »
Like New Jersey, Direct Retail Sales of Tesla Automobiles Not Allowed in Connecticut
Mar 19, 2014 12:24 pm
The Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection is co-sponsoring a contest for the auto dealership...more »

Our Partners

˜

Education Reform Bill Still A Work In Progress

by Christine Stuart | Apr 19, 2012 5:30am
(8) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Education

Christine Stuart file photo

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy

As with any major piece of legislation the conversations surrounding the education reform package have moved behind closed doors as Gov. Dannel P. Malloy and lawmakers try to iron out a deal.

It seems as if both were sticking to their respective positions on the more controversial pieces of the bill Wednesday causing Capitol insiders to wonder if it’s even possible to reach a compromise before the session ends May 9.

“Listen, we’re going to continue to advocate on behalf of real education reform in the state until we get a bill that’s acceptable,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said Wednesday as he exited an event in the Old Judiciary room.

Malloy, who opened up the legislative session two months ago with a 163-page bill that tackles teacher tenure and focuses on the state’s 30 lowest performing school districts, isn’t backing down from the positions expressed in his legislation.

At the end of March the Education Committee modified the governor’s bill and delayed tying teacher tenure to a new evaluation system in addition to modifying language regarding how the state could takeover the lowest performing school districts.

“I think what I’ve said was this bill is not acceptable,” Malloy said referring to the Education Committee’s version.

“I will remind you that it was the CEA in its presentation on reform, actually called for ending tenure. I never did that. I’m a supporter of tenure. Look at their brochure and ask them about it,” he told a group of reporters.

The Connecticut Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union, took out a half-page ad in the Hartford Courant Wednesday clarifying their position on the controversial teacher tenure issue.

“Our position has not changed for the past two years,” Mary Loftus Levine, executive director of the CEA, said Wednesday in a phone interview.

She said the CEA and AFT Connecticut‘s proposal was to streamline the tenure system, not eliminate it. The proposal calls for a streamlined system that would require one arbitrator, not three and a shortened due process timeline, she said. Any decision made by the lone arbitrator would be binding.

Christine Stuart file photo

Mary Loftus Levine, executive director of CEA, with AFT Connecticut President Sharon Palmer in the background

“Tenure is not a job for life,” Loftus Levine insisted responding to the opening day remarks by the governor.

“Tenure is nothing more than the right to due process, but the governor fuels the misunderstanding that it is something else,” the CEA ad in the Courant reads. “And he adds insult to injury when he claims teacher evaluation, tenure, and certification should be lumped together.”

Part of that lumping includes tying tenure which would need to be earned and re-earned under Malloy’s proposal to a new untested evaluation system.

Loftus Levine said the Performance Evaluation Advisory Council which has been meeting since 2010 to create and develop guidelines for teacher evaluations on a statewide basis has not completed its work.

Part of the reason is that Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor didn’t want the council to meet last year from August until December to give him time to get up to speed on the process, Loftus Levine said. If he hadn’t delayed those meetings then the evaluation process would have already been finalized, she opined.

“Governor Malloy’s most disingenuous claim is that teachers agreed to this chaotic recipe,“ the CEA ad goes onto say. “Teachers agreed to a framework for evaluations but absolutely nothing like what the governor has proposed.”

Rep. Andrew Fleischmann, co-chairman of the Education Committee, has insisted that the bill the governor originally proposed would not have had enough support in either chamber to become law.

What the governor put before the legislature on Feb. 8 “was draft 1.0,“ Fleischmann has said. “What the Education Committee voted out on Monday was draft 2.0 and I’m sure that there will be a version 3.0 and 4.0.”

Fleischmann explained it’s difficult to get 151 lawmakers in the House and 36 in the Senate to agree on something.

“To help a bill become a law I have to have the votes,” Fleischmann said. “Anything that goes to his desk will have to have enough support to go to his desk, so with that understood I’m sure there will be discussions and I’m sure things will change.”

They may have changed slightly since Fleischmann made those comments on March 28, but not enough for either side to declare victory or wave the white flag.

“There are some obvious areas where there’s distance between what the governor proposed and what the Education Committee passed,” Fleischmann said earlier this week after exiting a closed-door meeting on the bill.

“Without getting into the details, to be respectful of the process, I see some progress,” he added.

But finding a compromise in the allotted timeframe between the two versions of the bill may still prove difficult for the two sides.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Share this story with others.

Share | |

(8) Comments

posted by: Linda12 | April 19, 2012  7:27am

I wrote to the Governor’s office three weeks ago (I have notification that is was received and they would be getting back to me).  I asked him to find out why all the PEAC meetings had been canceled if he wanted to move this bill and the evaluation piece forward.

I still have not received an answer possibly because he doesn’t know and/or that is not really his main concern.  He speaks in half truths and repeats the same sound bites over and over again hoping to confuse the general public and further taint them against the public school teachers.

If he has convinced himself that he has been respectful of teachers, he is delusional.

I will never vote for him again. He is not to be trusted.

See the list of meetings canceled

posted by: Linda12 | April 19, 2012  7:32am

Beware of the GNESPA/Students First mailing.

Michelle Rhee is the Sarah Palin of the billionaire funded deform movement.

She does two things very well: raise money and promote herself. She is the Bernie Madoff of education “reform”. 

check out her latest fraudulent act

posted by: Martha H | April 19, 2012  1:31pm

Martha H

In 2012, the education status quo—what is going on everywhere—is the rush to privatize public education.

What a shame if Connecticut settles for the education status quo.

[...Which is manifestly anti-“evidence-based,” anti-“research-based,” anti-teacher, and thus, ultimately, so harshly anti-student.]

posted by: GoatBoyPHD | April 19, 2012  2:26pm

GoatBoyPHD

In Indiana, the savings from voucher schools are redistributed to the host districts by the state to expand other programs.

It’s a system designed to encourage cost containment savings and instructional expansion into pre-schools, summer sessions, all day school, etc.

It’s hoped the systme feed itself over the years and generates enough savings to create a wide array fo enrichment programs throughout Indiana.

Here’s the latest from Indiana:

“Voucher Program Redistributes Nearly $4.2 Million in Savings to Indiana Schools in Year One; Officials Launch New Campaign to Educate Parents on School Choice Options”

http://tinyurl.com/6o2pjth

Malloy’s problem: he bought into one of the msot expensive alternatives in the Nation. Charter Schools will little savings.

OTOH the general Democrats problem is well known: bought and sold by the public sector unions atthe expense of taxpayers and the academic opportunities for the kids.

It’s a shame the CT GOP is so feeble and disinterested in much of anything except perpetuating their failure to artfully think out of the box about much of anything. Except more failure. And The Curse of Jonah.

posted by: DrHunterSThompson | April 19, 2012  2:35pm

It begins with early education, parenting skills, and after school programs. We need to concentrate first on promoting a love of learning and curiosity at an early age. Let’s start there.

We can work on administrator and teacher reforms after we nail that down successfully.

posted by: GoatBoyPHD | April 19, 2012  5:22pm

GoatBoyPHD

In Indiana, the savings from voucher schools are redistributed to the host districts by the state to expand other programs.

It’s a system designed to encourage cost containment savings and instructional expansion into pre-schools, summer sessions, all day school, etc.

It’s hoped the system feeds itself over the years and generates enough savings to create a wide array of enrichment programs throughout Indiana.

Here’s the latest from Indiana:

“Voucher Program Redistributes Nearly $4.2 Million in Savings to Indiana Schools in Year One; Officials Launch New Campaign to Educate Parents on School Choice Options”

http://tinyurl.com/6o2pjth

When will civic duty in CT be defined as using a regional voucher for a public, private, parochial or qualified home school knowing that the district will get a savings distribution earmarked for creating additional enrichment programs for Summer or late night or pre-schools? Then we have a win/win for students, parents and taxpayers.

Let taxpayers and parents vote with their feet

posted by: RJEastHartford | April 19, 2012  10:23pm

More reporting is necessary as we begin to scratch the surface, The real issue here is all about monetizing education by taking it private. What hedge fund, private equity investor would not want to capture a steady, large tax revenue stream that has consistently and historically poured into education. If “reform” is worth doing, it worth doing for money. Check this out

posted by: Linda12 | April 19, 2012  11:44pm

Yes, RJ and thanks for supporting teachers. <a >Read all the comments too</a>.  To think my tax dollars, due to some trickery on Pryor’s part, were being used to screw me at the same time. How infuriating!  .  

Didn’t Pryor also use SERC as a front for the Adamowski special pension?  

And we trust these people to provide reform for our children?  I wouldn’t let Dannel or Stefan walk my dog!