Social Networks We Use

Categories

CT Tech Junkie Feed

Connecticut Consumers to Begin Receiving E-Book Settlement Refunds
Mar 25, 2014 4:09 pm
Connecticut residents will start receiving refund checks or credits this week for e-books purchased between April 1,...more »
Like New Jersey, Direct Retail Sales of Tesla Automobiles Not Allowed in Connecticut
Mar 19, 2014 12:24 pm
The Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection is co-sponsoring a contest for the auto dealership...more »

Our Partners

˜

Election 2012 Will Be A ‘Teachable Moment’

by Hugh McQuaid | Sep 11, 2012 4:00pm
(5) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Education, Election 2012

Slide from one of the secretary of the state’s web seminars

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill wants to use this year’s presidential election as a “teachable moment” for Connecticut kids to learn about civic engagement and our system of government.

Merrill’s office is planning on launching a series of online seminars that teachers can use to teach civics lessons. The goal is to tap into the interest and excitement generated by the presidential race.

“One of the most important things we can do is bring our students into the democracy,” Merrill said Tuesday. “This is the moment everyone’s paying attention to the government system because it’s an election year for the president. I think it’s a teachable moment if you will.”

The “webinars” are designed so teachers will be able to use them in the classroom, and will feature interesting people talking about why they chose to become involved in government, she said.

“This way a teacher doesn’t have to reinvent all this. Teachers are always looking for material, this year in particular, they’re all looking for material on the election,” Merrill said.

The secretary of the state spoke about the program at a Tuesday meeting of the Connecticut Civic Health Advisory Group. She told the group her office developed the curriculum to coincide with the fall election when teachers may be inclined to teach civics.

“It’s all around this presidential election . . . The theory is it might get used because there’s sort of a motivating date there and this would be the time they would mostly likely want to teach something like that,” she said.

Merrill said there’s a huge need for more civic engagement on the part of young people. Democracy rests on it’s citizens being engaged on the issues and despite a law requiring civics be taught in schools, it’s an area that’s fallen by the wayside in recent years, she said.

“Survey after survey shows dismal results in terms of students knowing the most basic things about government, you know, even that there are three branches of government, even the structural things much less the critical thinking you need to be a citizen in a democracy,” Merrill said.

In Connecticut, teachers have quite a bit of leeway when it comes to what they teach, Merrill said. So how much a student learns about civics and government depends in large part on how much interest the teacher has in the subject and how creative they are, particularly at the elementary school level, she said.

The webinars are being developed at three different grade levels and will be available online. Merrill said the curriculum for the courses was developed with the help of the Connecticut Council on Social Studies and Berlin High School teacher David Bosso, who was named the state teacher of the year.

“If you have creative teachers involved, that’s where you get the good ideas on how to do this,” she said.

The lessons will include topics like the electoral college, how votes are calculated, as well as how to assess arguments and the news media. They also include a model for schools to set up mock elections.

Over the summer, Merrill’s office conducted four webinars designed to give teachers the tools to teach civics lessons. Her staff said around 20 teachers participated in the live events, but more have accessed the videos on her website.

Now that kids are back in school, Merrill’s office is beginning to launch the seminars aimed directly at students. The first event will take place on Sept. 27 and will feature a lesson on election history.

Tags: , , , , ,

Share this story with others.

Share | |

(5) Comments

posted by: brutus2011 | September 12, 2012  12:17am

brutus2011

I think this is great stuff!

Although I am not sure how teaching critical thinking skills matches up with Gov. Malloy’s support of the charter school boy’s attempt to make drones of our kids via standardized testing.

But then, this governor is most likely a “one-and-doner.”

And if so, then his State Commissioner of Education, Stefan Pryor, can go back to Achievement First and ConnCan.

Maybe then we can get back to teaching our kids (in public schools-the rich have always done it where they send their children to school) how to be effective citizens for the societal challenges ahead.

posted by: Archie Bunker1 | September 12, 2012  8:41am

The “teachable moment” should remain in the classroom with our educators teaching students what democracy is supposed to look like and how the framers of our constitution intended it to look like. This should not be taught by POLITICIANS who will sway their votes depending on lobbyists, money, popularity of pending legislation or what the Speaker tells you to do. Put that in your ballot box Denise Merrill.

posted by: MGKW | September 12, 2012  10:45am

I think this is fine…my wife takes kids to DC in June every year, they visit all the sites and talk with legislators to understand how it all fits together…it is not propaganda in that kids are tickled to be witness to history…this year they were there when the Supreme Court decision was announced…How can that not be a positive learning experience?

Note to ArchieBunker1…small-mindedness and cynicism still exist but that does not mean you have to contribute to it.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS | September 12, 2012  11:57am

The teachable moment should teach that all you have to do is buy crooked politicians to get what you want.

posted by: saramerica | September 12, 2012  2:19pm

saramerica

One of the most important things schools need to teach - I know some are already doing this - is Media Literacy. Students learn to evaluate the media they consume for accuracy,sourcing, bias etc. One of the things I learned to do a long time ago is to constantly looking at news from multiple sources, including those OUTSIDE the US. It helps one to gain perspective.