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Hurricane Season Expected to Be Near-Normal

by Jhansi Katechia | Jun 4, 2014 9:27am
(4) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Public Safety, Weather

Tony Land file photo

Radar of Tropical Storm Irene from inside the Hurricane Hunter

Experts say that residents should prepare for a near-normal hurricane season this year.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts up to 13 named storms, of which six will become hurricanes, and at least two are expected to be major hurricanes.

“We all need to remind ourselves that predictions are just predictions,” Connecticut Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Spokesman Scott DeVico said. “We are always planning and preparing. And we certainly do not base our level of preparation on the predictions.”

Last year’s predictions called for an above average year, however, it ended up being an average year, according to DeVico.

New England’s recent hurricanes Irene and Sandy have taught Connecticut residents to be more prepared. In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene traveled up the east coast and lasted about six days at the end of August. It became a hurricane well before hitting Connecticut and weakened as it came across New England.

In 2012, Hurricane Sandy moved through the Atlantic and eventually across New England. According to a report by the National Hurricane Center, Sandy was responsible for 72 deaths. Five of those were in Connecticut.

Last year’s hurricane season was well below average. Although the season had 14 storms, only two became hurricanes. According to the National Hurricane Center Annual Summary, the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was the quietest season in the past two decades.

But that’s no reason for Connecticut residents to let their guard down.

DeVico reminds residents that “it only takes one storm to come up the coast and impact the state, and devastating consequences. We need all residents to be our partners in emergency management and be prepared.”

“Every home should have a basic emergency plan that can be used for any emergency,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said in a press release. “I urge residents to know what potential risks your community and neighborhood may face, such as storm surge, flooding, road or bridge closures.”

Malloy advises that a hurricane season preparation kit contain the following items:

  • One gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • At least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • A whistle to signal for help
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • A manual can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

  • Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection Commissioner Dora B. Schriro said there are three tips to be prepared: get a kit, make a plan, and stay informed.

    Schriro recommends residents “carefully monitor weather reports and promptly follow instructions from public safety officials if a storm approaches.”

    DeVico says there will be a statewide emergency preparedness exercise at the end of June. The drill will be conducted at the governor’s direction and it will simulate a hurricane impacting the state. Last year, the state simulated an ice storm.

    The 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season runs until November 30.

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    (4) Comments

    posted by: Joebigjoe | June 4, 2014  1:34pm

    If we have more hurricanes its global warming. If we have less hurricanes its global warming. Which is it?

    Doesnt matter as Al Gore has just joined an investment firm focused on green energy businesses so he needs to make his money coming and going.

    If the guy went to work for the Peace Corps and cried “global warming” I would pay more attention, but although there may be global warming taking place , since these people are out to make massive coin from it, I knock down much of what they say.

    If they really were frightened for the planet and mankind why would you try to make big bucks off it?

    posted by: Christine Stuart | June 4, 2014  4:20pm

    Christine Stuart

    The reason I had the intern write the story was because whatever happens an October storm could impact the election, so it’s a story we may be able to use in the future if need be. Fingers crossed the storm won’t impact us this year.

    posted by: DrHunterSThompson | June 4, 2014  4:30pm

    DrHunterSThompson

    Yo! Big joe!

    Climate change (probably the term you meant to use) is science.  why is it that you right wing t-bag types always try to politicise it?

    HST

    posted by: Joebigjoe | June 5, 2014  7:31am

    HST, if Climate Change is science how do you explain the scientists that don’t buy into it and now the ones that had signed on to the “science” as you call it and now after further review and more facts have changed their minds.

    If this is settled science then I guess trickle down economics is as well, so we should just accept that.

    My opinion is that there has been a change in the jet stream for some reason. I also think that its so easy to say that if temps go up less than a degree on earth that its “climate change or global warming”.

    However if we cant even agree what the weather will be in 4-5 days, how can we have so much knowledge about our sun where we can discount that something changed in the sun…like its temperature which would impact ours.

    Lets also say I buy into your climate change argument and we do things to reduce our emissions which costs us all alot of money and jobs. China is by far the worst polluter of all so last I looked, if they do what they want and we do the so called right thing, we havent really done anything other than to hurt our economy, as we suck in their pollution, so we can reduce our economic standing in the world.

    The day China signs on, we can talk.