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Poll Finds Support For Stricter Gun Laws, Armed Police In Schools

by Christine Stuart | Jan 31, 2013 11:49am
(4) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Poll

Christine Stuart file photo

State Police Detective Barbara Mattson holds up a gun for lawmakers during a demonstration Monday

A new poll found that 64 percent of Connecticut residents favor stricter gun laws, with 57 percent saying the Sandy Hook shooting made them more likely to back gun control measures.

The University of Connecticut/Hartford Courant poll released Wednesday found 50 percent of individuals outside the state of Connecticut support stricter gun laws, while 46 percent believe the current laws should remain unchanged.

Nationally, 48 percent support a ban on “military style assault weapons,” while in Connecticut support for such a measure is 60 percent.

Connecticut already has an assault weapon ban that has been on the books since 1994. The federal assault weapons ban, which included a ban on magazines with more than 10 bullets, expired in 2004.

Nationally, 53 percent strongly support or somewhat support a ban on high capacity magazines that hold more than 10 bullets, while 64 percent of the 500 Connecticut residents surveyed felt the same way.

An overwhelming number of individuals support a law that would require background checks before a gun is purchased. The poll found 84 percent strongly support or somewhat support the measure nationally. In Connecticut, that number goes up to 90 percent.

Asked if they supported stricter gun laws or armed guards in schools, the poll found that 43 percent preferred armed guards in schools while 42 percent supported stronger gun laws. In Connecticut, 45 percent supported stricter guns law over the 36 percent who support armed guards in schools.

In Connecticut, the poll found 56 percent support increased state spending on mental health screening and treatment as a “very effective” way to prevent mass shootings in schools. Meanwhile, nationwide about 42 percent believe that more mental health spending was a “very effective” way of dealing with these types of shootings. About 35 percent of people nationally believe decreasing gun violence in movies is a “very effective” way to prevent mass shootings, and in Connecticut that number is around 36 percent.

Although large numbers of Americans say strategies like restricting access to schools during class time and increasing police presence would likely be very effective in reducing violence, none of the proposed solutions —including changes to school buildings and arming teachers and other adults — won support from a majority.

The poll of Connecticut residents found that 51 percent think restricting public access to school buildings during the day would be very effective at reducing violence. Forty-two percent think increasing police presence at schools would be very effective. Thirty-six percent think making physical changes to school buildings, like bulletproof glass, would be very effective and 12 percent think arming teachers or other school officials would be very effective.

Nationally, 39 percent surveyed thought it would be very effective or somewhat effective to arm teachers. In Connecticut, that number drops to 27 percent. But when asked if the person in the school should be an armed police officer, those who think it would be very or somewhat effective jumps to 76 percent in Connecticut and 79 percent nationally.

“It’s striking that while Americans remain divided on the broader question of gun control, these specific proposals — all of which are part of President Obama’s recent set of executive orders on gun control — are finding favor with people,” UConn Poll Director Jennifer Necci Dineen said in a statement.

The national poll of 1,002 adults has a 3 percent margin of error. The Connecticut sample of 511 adults has a 4 percent margin of error. Both polls were conducted between Jan. 22 and Jan. 28.

Click here for the results the Connecticut poll and here for the results of the national poll.

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(4) Comments

posted by: Chien DeBerger | January 31, 2013  2:04pm

Funny how Barbara is getting all of the pictures. In our in-service training she has publicly stated that the present “assault weapon” law is so convoluted, that it is unworkable. She stated she would like to see in repealed.

I have to commend the news propaganda media on spinning their narrative. DOJ numbers reflect that violent crime is the lowest since the mid-1960’s. But that doesn’t stop the dishonest with an agenda.

I just wish they had the outrage for the murder of the unborn in the name of “Reproductive Rights.” Maybe if the abortion doctor shot each of the almost 60 million children with a assault weapon, we might get the same outrage from the news media. I am not holding my breath.

Way to keep the low information voter duped.

posted by: cnj-david | January 31, 2013  2:31pm

From Wikipedia comes:  ‘“Lies, damned lies, and statistics” is a phrase describing the persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. It is also sometimes colloquially used to doubt statistics used to prove an opponent’s point.’

Perhaps the most telling statistic provided in the poll of Connecticut residents is the number of polled people who are gun-owners .vs. those who live in house-holds without guns.  Slight variances, but roughly 132 gun-owners were polled .vs. 345 people who live in households without any guns.

So, it comes as no surprise that the polled group’s numbers as percentages advance additional gun control legislation.  It would appear that many people who don’t own guns believe that the rest of the population shouldn’t either.

posted by: ASTANVET | January 31, 2013  3:31pm

So if 73% of America wanted to jump off a bridge that would be ok then right?  It is not the bill of wants, or the bill of needs.  It is the bill of rights.  It is guaranteed by the State constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Why does no one take credit for a more than 50% reduction in violent crime over the last 15 years?  maybe because they have an agenda.  They can whip up people into a mob to meet that agenda much easier when a) the media is complicit b) they distort truth and fact and c) they make it a populist issue.  The most vocal advocates for these bans know the least about weapons and less about real crime statistics.  The enemy is not semi-automatic magazine fed rifles – the enemy is the evil that resides in the hearts of men.  If you want to talk violence, why don’t you talk about the overwhelming violence that comes from metropolitan areas?  Why don’t you talk about a cycle of poverty, gang affiliation and drug culture that surrounds the majority of violence.  No, the majority of people do not want to discuss these issues… it is much easier to blame a black rifle with a pistol grip and a magazine.

posted by: sanecitizen | January 31, 2013  3:46pm

66 percent of the people polled were Democrats.  Of course the results are going to reflect that?

I’m not sure why this is reportable news.  It would be like polling a bunch of Catholics to see if they believe in Jesus.