Social Networks We Use

Categories

CT Tech Junkie Feed

Some Customers Say Transition From AT&T To Frontier Has Been Bumpy
Oct 29, 2014 2:26 pm
(Updated 7 p.m.) Customers who previously had AT&T Inc. landline, Internet, and video services were switched over to...more »
Social Enterprise Trust Honors Entrepreneurs Who Hope to Change the World
Oct 28, 2014 11:51 pm
Entrepreneurs interested in making social changes across the world as well as growing their bottom line are an...more »

Our Partners

˜

Sunday Deer Hunting Bill Clears House

by Hugh McQuaid | May 2, 2014 12:23am
(8) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: Agriculture, Public Safety

Courtesy of the DEEP Property owners in areas of the state overpopulated by deer would be permitted to hunt the animals with bows on Sundays under legislation approved by the House Thursday night.

The bill cleared the chamber on a 111-30 vote after a short debate around 11 p.m.

Sunday bowhunting drew strong support from Republicans in the House, who succeeded in passing a similar bill last year. That bill was never acted upon by the Senate.

This year’s legislation is more restrictive. It only allows the Sunday hunting in “deer management zones” approved by the state Energy and Environmental Protection Department. The agency backed the legislation as a deer population control measure.

“This is actually more focused on deer overpopulation,” Rep. John Shaban, the Environment Committee’s ranking Republican, said. “It’s a good wildlife bill. It’s a good land management bill. It’s a good public safety bill, because overpopulation of deer leads to death and sickness with lyme disease, car strikes.”

Rep. Diana Urban, D-North Stonington, opposed the bill as she has during past years. She said her opposition stems from her work with children riding horses in the woods.

“I would like them not to have to think about on a Sunday possibly seeing a wounded deer or something along those lines,” she said. Although the bill only applies to certain private property, Urban said children often do not recognize property boundaries.

In written testimony earlier this year, DEEP Commissioner Robert Klee said his department has taken a number of steps since 2000 to reduce the number of deer in the state and considers Sunday bowhunting “one of the last remaining progressive measures designed to meet management objectives.”

There were about 120,000 deer in the state when the department last did an estimate about five years ago, according to DEEP spokesman Dennis Schain. Since then the agency has been focused on regions of the state like Fairfield County, where the animals have become most problematic, he said.

In order to reach the governor’s desk the legislation will need to be approved by the Senate before the session ends on May 7. Last year, Senate Democrats declined to raise the bill, which sparked a dispute with House Republicans in the final hours of the session.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Share this story with others.

Share | |

(8) Comments

posted by: Atuno | May 2, 2014  9:36am

Once again, legislators are tone deaf to facts, relying on misinformation from representatives of a small group, 1% of CT population, allowing them ONE more day of hunting on Sunday. Considering that that they hunt 6 days a week, one more day wouldn’t make an iota of difference!  This is total disregard for the majority; who needs to worry about a neighbor allowing hunting on Sunday, too?

posted by: Salmo | May 2, 2014  5:32pm

Yeah, Ms. Urban, that’s right. Children often do not recognize property boundaries. And that is getting to be a big problem here in Connecticut. But, to the point: Deer certainly do not recognize property lines, either. If Sunday hunting is to be allowed the general public needs to completely understand what that means regarding their safety and what they should do to protect themselves.

posted by: waltc | May 12, 2014  1:52pm

“The six days a week that hunters are out there now, there has not been an incident of a bowhunter injuring a hiker or someone out in the woods since the dawn of modern hunting regulations in Connecticut in 1974,” DEEP spokesman, Dennis Schain, said.

So again for all those who “claim” to live in fear over this…...That’s 40 years with zero incidents since bowhunting began in CT. 

And in 36 years of bowhunting - NEVER has a person or a wandering pet walked anywhere near me, that I didn’t already see or hear coming, LONG before they ever came into range.

posted by: Gashton | May 13, 2014  12:22am

waltc - believe it or not, but it would be great knowing that on just one day, Sunday, those who do not appreciate hunting on neighbors’ properties, could just relax and feel secure that neither an injured deer nor a hunter could end up in your backyard while having a pleasant afternoon bar-b-q! No one is claiming deaths of people, but you know as well as anyone that people’s dogs, cats, horses have been killed or injured with arrows….kinda hard to confuse a cat with a deer, eh?  Friends had a deer die practically on their porch…an arrow protruding from the chest, bleeding to death, and it was neither quick, nor a pretty sight, especially for their young kids.  Several hours later, a hunter dressed in camo casually sauntered into their backyard looking for the deer.  Where was he hunting?  Two properties down the road from their house…I hope you can possibly understand that it’s not about people walking under your tree stand - why would anyone walk around a neighbor’s property?

posted by: waltc | May 13, 2014  8:49am

Gashton - I was responding to Salmo’s comments regarding kids not respecting property lines and what people need to do regarding their safety and what they should do to protect themselves ??????????? It’s been my experience unfortunately that people who hide behind false claims that they FEAR bowhunting for saftey reasons, either know nothing about it, or are strictly anti-hunting to begin with.

Now to your comment about all the dogs, cats and other animals injured with arrows….NO. I do NOT know “as well as anyone” about that. You make it sound like a daily occurrence??? Its far more likely that those pet incidents are non-hunters with bows (you don’t need to be a hunter to buy a bow, or are you required to take the mandatory hunter safety course) No hunter shoots cats and dogs on purpose - and the odds of it being an accident are staggering.

While it sounds like your neighbor had a bad experience with someone hunting small property, that is not the norm. I can’t hunt my 200acre farm on a Sunday that’s 50 miles away from you because you are bar-b-q outside???

You can’t dictate what other people do legally on their own private property. And you certainly can relax and enjoy your Sunday, like you enjoy all your event free Saturdays. The odds of you even seeing a hunter at all are like 5000 to 1. Don’t assume the worst all the time.

posted by: waltc | May 13, 2014  8:53am

continued….. While it sounds like your neighbor had a bad experience with someone hunting small property, that is not the norm. I can’t hunt my 200acre farm on a Sunday that’s 50 miles away from you because you are bar-b-q outside???

You can’t dictate what other people do legally on their own private property. And you certainly can relax and enjoy your Sunday, like you enjoy all your event free Saturdays. The odds of you even seeing a hunter at all are like 5000 to 1. Don’t assume the worst all the time.

posted by: Gashton | May 13, 2014  3:42pm

waltc - excuse me, but regarding pets and other domestic animals found having been killed or injured by arrows, all one needs to do is Google them.  It may not be a big deal nor a daily occurrence, but it matters to those to whom it happens.
Regarding bowhunting on small properties, all bowhunting in towns would and do occur on what you would you consider small property - people’s backyards.  And as you know, I’m sure, there are no minimum acreage requirements for bowhunting! If you paid some attention, this legislation was meant just for that - for certain Zones in Fairfield County, not huge acreages! Therefore, everything that I wrote makes perfect sense to those who live near neighbors who allow hunting on their own private property, with permission. FYI - there have also been letters to the editor in Fairfield County papers about experiences with deer dying on people’s property, having been shot elsewhere. People are quite aware of the fact that deer do not die on the spot…..

posted by: Atuno | May 13, 2014  3:57pm

waltc, you say: “You can’t dictate what other people do legally on their own private property.”

I beg to differ; there are many things you may not do even on your own property, legality has its limitations, too, such as zoning restrictions, town laws and regulations, etc.! I also say that you do not have the right to dictate to your neighbors, either! 

It isn’t even a matter of rights.  Feeling safe and secure on one’s own property is a right!  Hunting is not a right, it is a privilege for which one must be licensed!

Since town residents may live next to those who permit hunters on their land, they may not necessarily have the luxury of having 200 acres next door…..