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VIDEO | US Spying Put Lavabit Owner Out of Business

by Lon Seidman | Nov 1, 2013 8:18am
(2) Comments | Commenting has expired
Posted to: CT Tech Junkie

Ladar Levison was the founder and owner of secure email service Lavabit that was shut down earlier this year after he was forced to turn the site’s encryption keys over to the government.

Levison, interviewed by This Week in Tech’s Leo Laporte, says the government forced him to release the site’s secure encryption keys that would have given them access to data flowing in and out of the service from all users - not just a single target. It is believed that Edward Snowden, who continues to leak classified NSA documents to the media, was using the service to communicate with journalists.

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(2) Comments

posted by: dano860 | November 1, 2013  9:45am

Christine, great post. It is real scary to think that we are so vulnerable to the whims of what is increasingly an invasive government.
Is this something that could happen to you?
After seeing the report of the hacking of the Owebama care site in CT (Access CT) and the fact that two of the hacks was from foreign sources and then they called in the N.S.A. to solve the problem, it makes one wonder how safe anything is on this internet.
Companies are at peril of the government taking any of their priority information at any time.
Big brother is looking at you through that smart T.V. ...exercise now, is that next?

posted by: Historian | November 1, 2013  1:44pm

Of interest is the fact that after WW1 commercial crypto equiptment - the famous “inigma” coding device and actual code books were sold commercially to allow telegraph messages to be shortened and private. That private practice is now, apparently, illegal.  I believe it was for Secretary of War Stimson, who shut down his departments code breaking office during the 20’s with the comment “Gentlemen do not read other’s mail.”
  Of course they were not facing some of the sophisticated maniacs we are..but ——.